May or might?

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When is it right to use may and when to use might? Opinions vary, depending on what you read. Here are a few guidelines culled from the Economist Style Guide and the Oxford Guide to English Usage. 1. If the truth of the event is unknown, then may or might are interchangeable. • I may/might […]

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Writing tips for nurses, Nursing Standard

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Being a capable wordsmith may not be what you signed up for. But clinical nurses are spending more and more of their working day on writing tasks. Rob Ashton of Emphasis gives six tips on how nurses can become better writers. A well-presented document, a clear and succinct email, a precise and persuasive report all […]

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Reader-profile questionnaire

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That business writing should be centred on the reader’s needs is not exactly earth-shattering news. But putting this maxim into practice is a different matter altogether. Reader-centred writing If you’re like most people, you’re much more likely to be focused on your own needs – such as impressing your manager or getting the task of […]

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Executive summaries

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No matter how well structured and well written your report is, some clients will feel they only have time to read the executive summary – and this is particularly true for senior management. So it is absolutely essential that you put a lot of thought into its structure and content: * Make sure the summary […]

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Power to the people

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People power counts for a lot in writing. ‘One in a hundred people’ is likely to produce a much bigger reaction from readers of your reports than ‘one per cent’, even though they obviously mean the same thing. Before you dismiss this as another example of general ignorance, you should know that experts are not […]

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